further checklist of this separate editions of Jefferson"s Notes on the State of Virginia.
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further checklist of this separate editions of Jefferson"s Notes on the State of Virginia.

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Published by Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826 -- Bibliography.,
  • Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826.

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsZ8452 .V4
The Physical Object
Pagination26 l.
Number of Pages26
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6090060M
LC Control Number51006001
OCLC/WorldCa7445779

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A further checklist of the separate editions of Jefferson's Notes on the State of : Coolie. Verner. Coolie Verner, A Further Checklist of the Separate Editions of Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia (Charlottesville: Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia, ), 9. Jefferson to John W. Campbell, September 3, , in PTJ:RS, . Thomas Jefferson1 About this text: Notes on the State of Virginia () is Jefferson's compilation of extensive data about Virginia's geography, resources, economy, laws, and inhabitants. It is both a meticulous account of the state of Virginia and an inquiry into the nature of justice and of what it means to be a human being. Jefferson. In , in Paris, Jefferson paid to have copies of his revised text printed for private distribution as Notes on the State of Virginia. Two years later, in , he authorized his London bookseller, John Stockdale, to publish for general sale a somewhat expanded edition of the work.

Funding from the University of North Carolina Library supported the electronic publication of this title. (title page) Notes on the State of Virginia. Call number FJ42 (Rare Book Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) This electronic edition is a part of . Notes On The State Of Virginia by Thomas Jefferson Page 4 Introduction to Notes of the State of Virginia by Thomas Jefferson The wide reputation and high value that have been accorded to the Notes on Virginia for over one hundred years make any attempt to praise it at this day little less than a work of supererogation. Notes on the State of Virginia () is a book written by Thomas completed the first version in , and updated and enlarged the book in and Notes on the State of Virginia originated in Jefferson's responding to questions about Virginia, posed to him in by François Barbé-Marbois, then Secretary of the French delegation in Philadelphia, the temporary capital of. Get an answer for 'Summarize Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia.' and find homework help for other Notes on the State of Virginia questions at eNotes.

A request in by the French legation to the United States to learn more about the newly formed thirteen states of America stimulated in Jefferson, as he later described it, a "mysterious obligation for making me much better acquainted with my own country than I ever was before." Written during his first term as governor of Virginia, Notes on the State of Virginia is at once a scientific 3/5(1).   Notes on the State of Virginia is the only full length book written by Thomas Jefferson. He finished the first edition in , and updated and enlarged the book in and Notes on the State of Virginia originated as Jefferson’s response to questions about Virginia, posed to him in by François Barbé-Marbois, then Secretary of Author: Steve Straub. Notes on the state of Virginia. Contributor Names Jefferson, Thomas, Three separate manuscripts bound in 1 volume. The first ([42] p.) measures 30 x 10 cm, and is an index, written in a 17th century hand. Thomas M. (Thomas Mann) - Thomas Jefferson Library Collection (Library of Congress) - Virginia - Jefferson, Thomas Date. Thomas Jefferson wrote that “all men are created equal,” and yet enslaved more than six-hundred people over the course of his life. Although he made some legislative attempts against slavery and at times bemoaned its existence, he also profited directly from the institution of slavery and wrote that he suspected black people to be inferior to white people in his Notes on the State of Virginia.